Executive Chef

What Is An Executive Chef?

An executive chef is in charge of all food service operations. In addition, he/she may supervise the several kitchens of a hotel, restaurant group, or corporate dining operation.

What Does An Executive Chef Do?

The specific responsibilities of executive chefs are determined by a number of factors, including the type of establishment in which they work. Because they are in charge of food service operations and may supervise the kitchens, responsibilities include: determining menus, ordering food products, staffing the kitchens and dining operations, and serving as the public "face" of the entire food service operation.

Characteristics/Qualifications Of An Executive Chef

Executive chefs should work well as part of a team, have a keen sense of taste and smell, and work efficiently in a fast-paced environment. Personal hygeine is essential since health certificates indicating that workers are disease-free are often required.

Executive chefs who work in upscale restaurants require an intense desire to cook. In addition, many years of training and experience are required. Some may start their training in high school or post-high school vocational programs. Others may receive formal training through cooking schools, culinary institutes, or 2- or 4-year college degree programs in hospitality or culinary arts. Some large hotels and restaurants also have their own training for chefs. Most training programs require some form of apprenticeship or internship offered by the school and affiliated restaurants. Many chefs are trained on the job, receiving real work experience and training from chef mentors in the restaurants where they work.

The Nitty Gritty: Salary

The median salary for an executive chef is $70,549 (according to salary.com's analysis using their Certified Compensation Professionals' analysis of survey data collected from thousands of HR departments at employers of all sizes, industries and geographies).

 
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